The U.S. Automotive Market and Industry in 2025

This study conducted by the Center for Automotive Research (CAR) estimates the likely parameters of the U.S. motor vehicle market and industry in 2025. The first section discusses a general outlook for the U.S. motor vehicle market in the year 2025 based on long term social and economic factors. The second section of this study discusses the likely costs of higher fuel economy mandates to the American consumer of new light vehicles in 2025, in light of what is known by CAR regarding the potential for realistic technologies and their likely net costs to the consumer. This section also proposes four likely scenarios for fuel economy standards by 2025 (compared to 2009) and the types of fuel economy technologies that will be employed to meet those standards. The third section of this study analyzes how the impact of higher fuel economy costs, and likely costs of other federal mandates such as required safety features, will affect the U.S. motor vehicle market, production, and automotive manufacturing employment in the year 2025

Powertrain Forecast and Analysis: What is Coming and What Are the Implications for the Specialty Equipment and Performance Aftermarket Industry

The Specialty Equipment Market Association (SEMA) and the Center for Automotive Research (CAR) have engaged in a multi-phased project to create vehicle technology planning and business strategy guideposts for SEMA members. The first Phase I report in the program—The Specialty Equipment Company of the Future: Guideposts for Technology Forecasting and Strategic Planning—was released in the third quarter of 2008. This, the Phase II second report—Powertrain Forecast and Analysis: What is Coming and What are the Implications for the Specialty Equipment and Performance Aftermarket Industry—addresses the rapidly changing powertrain paradigm in the U.S. market

The Specialty Equipment Automotive Company of the Future: Guideposts for Strategic Planning

The Specialty Equipment Market Association (SEMA) and the Center for Automotive Research (CAR) have engaged in a multi-phased project to create business strategy guideposts for SEMA members. The first report in the program—The Specialty Equipment Company of the Future: Guideposts for Technology Forecasting and Strategic Planning—identifies strategic challenges for SEMA and its member companies in the mid-term (3-7 years). The information presented is based on a series of interviews with thought leaders from vehicle manufacturers (VMs), original equipment (OE) parts suppliers, specialty equipment (SE) suppliers, and other auto industry stakeholders. These interviews were supported by literature reviews and other data gathering techniques.

Vehicle Technology Trends in Electronics for the North American Market; Opportunities for the Taiwanese Automotive Industry

The purpose of this study is to conduct a preliminary investigation into the future business potential for automotive electronics, particularly for general Taiwanese companies. Although many Taiwanese companies are targeting China as a growth opportunity, our preliminary investigation was based on North America with the understanding that a more targeted investigation for China could be a future investigation. We recognized that the North American perspective would provide significant input, even to the Chinese market, because many of the auto companies and supplier’s practices and projections are easy to generalize from since they are global.

Key Factors that Enable Product Development: An Investigation of Creating “Cool” Products

The Center for Automotive Research has undertaken the CAR-Microsoft Program on Automotive Industry Practices. The program is a four-year research effort consisting of indepth, focused interviews with industry participants on subjects of importance to all industry stakeholders. The intent of this paper is to investigate how different companies have adapted their product development processes to the changing competitive climate and how they utilize new technologies (e.g., weblogs, internet chat rooms, and other such digital communications) to transform their vision into products. The focus is not on the tools or the specific strategies, but rather on the information channels product design teams use for inspiration and understanding the market and on how the product design teams work together to create “cool” products.

This study was sponsored by Microsoft Corporation.

The Advanced Power Technology Dilemma: from Hydrocarbons to Hydrogen

Imagine that you’re an average consumer with limited knowledge of automotive technology, and you’re concerned about reports of global warming and America’s over dependence on foreign oil. You’ve probably read stories that the car manufacturers could use different technologies to improve fuel economy by producing hybrid-electric vehicles or making fuel cell powered cars that use hydrogen, not petroleum, and emit only water from their tailpipes. What’s your reaction?

This study was prepared by the Center for Automotive Research with generous support fromt the Robert Bosch Corporation.

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